Author: Aaron [Typographical Era]

Aaron Westerman is the Manager of Web Architecture for a national human services organization. When he's not busy tearing sites apart and rebuilding them, he spends his ever shrinking free time trying to keep up with his twins, reading works of translated literature, and watching far too many Oscar nominated movies.

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Podcast #13: A Tale for the Time Being by Ruth Ozeki

A_Tale_For_The_Time_BeingWe made it!

That’s a wrap!  Call it a year!  Last year we finished recording the podcasts before the big announcement, but we were’t able to release them all to the world until after.  This year, we worked overtime to get them all done on time.  This is our final podcast, and if you’re a fan of anus, it’s a great one.

In this episode Aaron compares Nao to Darling, Jackie reveals what her supapowa is, Karli thinks Aaron is too obsessed with anus and isn’t afraid to let him know it, and Michelle shockingly admits for the first time ever that she thinks that The Luminaries should win the prize.

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Booker_Conversations

2013 Booker Conversations: The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

Booker_ConversationsThe 2013 Booker Conversations is a series of in-depth, spoiler-free discussions between BookerMarks bloggers about this year’s nominated titles.

Today, Aaron Westerman, Penny Kollar, and Michelle Williams partake in an in-depth spoiler-free discussion about Lhumpa Lahiri’s novel The Lowland.

Aaron is Opinionless. Except of course when it comes to books or movies. He’s the co-founder of Typographical Era where he blogs on a regular basis about the latest in translated literature, foreign cinema, and more.

Penny is 1/3 of the Literary Hoarders that works in research administration by day and dreams often of reading and working amongst books full time.

Michelle is an avid “reader” of books and a “rider” of bicycles. When she is not cycling you can catch her reading and when she is not reading, well, she is probably pedaling about somewhere. Her blog, A Reader and A Rider journals her reviews of literary fiction.

Jhumpa Lahiri’s The Lowland tells the deeply moving story of two Indian brothers whose lives are forever changed by a tragic event that threatens to tear the very fabric of their family apart. It’s about how we get stuck, unable to shed the ties that bind us and leave the past where it belongs, but it’s also about misunderstanding and miscommunication, and what happens when lives are built around false assumptions.

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Podcast #12: We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo

We_Need_New_NamesWe’re getting there!

This is the sixth podcast this year, and the fifth discussion dedicated specifically to chatting about one of the finalists.  That means we’ve got just one podcast left to eek out after this, and if you’ve been keeping track at home, you know that we’re doing it just like mama always said.  That’s right, when you’ve got the cat by its balls, you save it for last.

In this episode Aaron sings a little song he wrote about the book, Jackie reveals that she actually finished listening to it before the recording (!), Karli tries to get her geometry homework done, and Michelle shockingly admits for the first time ever that she thinks that The Luminaries should win the prize and that Life After Life should have at least made the longlist.

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Booker_Conversations

2013 Booker Conversations: Harvest by Jim Crace

Booker_ConversationsThe 2013 Booker Conversations is a series of in-depth, spoiler-free discussions between BookerMarks bloggers about this year’s nominated titles.

Today, Aaron Westerman, Karli Cude, and Jennifer Fliss partake in an in-depth spoiler-free discussion about Jim Crace’s novel Harvest.

Aaron is Opinionless. Except of course when it comes to books or movies. He’s the co-founder of Typographical Era where he blogs on a regular basis about the latest in translated literature, foreign cinema, and more.

Karli Cude, co-founder of Typographical Era, is an avid reader and former bookseller. She graduated from the University of Tennessee with a B.A. in English Literature in 2010 and recently received a Master’s degree in Library and Information Sciences.

Jennifer Fliss is The Well Read Fish.  She’s an avid reader, writer, runner, and has been known to do the flying trapeze (completely true). In addition to literary treats and reviews, The Well Read Fish likes to pair like books with like books, be it by subject, style, setting . . . The Well Read Fish is a New York fish living in Seattle, loving it and occasionally struggling with it.

Jim Crace’s final novel Harvest has found itself nominated for both the Man Booker Prize and The Goldsmiths Prize. Set in an unspecified time period and told over seven days, Crace’s swan song boldly defies all of the expectations placed upon by casual fiction reader. Plot and character development fly out the window as Crace embarks upon an eloquent exploration of what happens when communication breaks down and trust dissolves.

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Podcast #11: The Lowland by Jhumpa Lahiri

Arthur Brown, BALCO, Colum McCann, Fredrick Douglass, gender, George Mitchell, history, John Alcock, Let the Great World Spin, Major League Baseball, national book award, Northern Ireland, TransatlanticTrue to our word, here’s podcast #3 of the week!

Three!  See.  I told you that we’d make up for lost time.  Didn’t believe me?  Take your punishment in the form of a deliciously enjoyable digital audio file.  Wait, what?  You did believe me?  The reward for your unwavering faith in my abilities is…a deliciously enjoyable digital audio file.  The margin between the winners and the losers this time is very, very small.

In this episode Aaron saves Jackie with a creative edit, Jackie admits that she hasn’t finished the book (recurring theme?), and Michelle dreams of having a daybed of her very own.

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2013 Shortlisted: We Need New Names by NoViolet Bulawayo #3

We_Need_New_NamesRating: 1
We Need New Names
A Novel by NoViolet Bulawayo

2013 / 304 Pages

Kaka

We all have problems.  I get that.  As adults it’s much easier to get caught in the trap of complaining about any given hardship that we encounter or bump in the road that we might face than it is to work towards a realistic solution to whatever the source of our current woe might be.  We’re only human.  We often get stuck in endless cycles of bad behavior, unable to rescue ourselves for torments that are mostly of our own creation.  Sometimes we fail.  Other times we succeed.  Both the highs and the lows can be wild, emotional roller coasters.

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