Alison Moore

Booker 2012

Where Are They Now?: The 2012 Shortlist Contenders

Booker 2012Oh what a difference a year makes!  We’re all focused with laser like intensity on the new crop of hopefuls that have emerged to fight it out for this year’s Man Booker Award.  We’re busy debating who will make the shortlist cut.  We’re itching to celebrate/complain about who gets crowned the winner.  But whatever became of the class of 2012?

Below we take a quick look at what last year’s finalists have been up to since the announcement of Hilary Mantel’s history making victory.

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Penny_Eats_Tripe

Bookermarks: 2013 Edition

Has it been a year already?  I feel like it’s only been a few weeks since we finished recording our final podcast, crossed our fingers in hopeful anticipation, and then openly wept when Deborah Levy lost the 2012 Man Booker Award.

Okay, fine.  Only one of us wept.

Still, the main thing we all agreed on at the end of the day was that any victory over Will Self would be enough to satisfy us.  Now here we all stand, about to unite for the second year of what is quickly becoming our annual tradition of passing judgment on all things Booker.  I’ve got a few new streamlined “rules” that we’re applying to this year’s proceedings that I need to get you up to speed on, but before I do, perhaps I should take a moment to catch you up on what each member of our crack team has been up to over the past year, and of course, introduce you all to our newest collaborator.

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Book Review: 2012 Shortlisted: Alison Moore’s The Lighthouse (Review #7)

Rating: 3
The Lighthouse
A Novel by Alison Moore
2012 / 192 Pages

Well, that was tragic.

I’m trying to recall a novel that oozed loneliness as much as The Lighthouse.  The characters were lonely.  The plot was lonely.  The symbolism was lonely.  The book’s prognosis was lonely.

I needed a hug when it was done.

In the midst of his wife leaving him, “Futh” decides to go on a walking holiday in Germany.  The trip is supposed to be restorative.  It’s supposed to offer healing.  Futh brings little, expects little, and is prepared for little.  The trip will unquestionably unearth his past, and cause him to reflect on his present.  Will he like what he uncovers?   Will he permit the shards of his memory permanent residence in his mind?  Ultimately, will this well-intentioned holiday feed his soul?

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Book Review: 2012 Long Listed: Alison Moore’s The Lighthouse (Review #5)

Rating: 3
The Lighthouse
A Novel by Alison Moore
2012 / 192 Pages

For my part of the Bookermarks Collaboration, I finished 6.5 books – all of the short list (except for the last half of Umbrella) and not counting the long listed Teleportation Accident in which I will finish sometime in the near future. The fourth book I read was Alison Moore’s The Lighthouse. Finishing it over a month ago, I still have not written the review for it. Why? Because I just don’t know what to write about. I liked it – but I just wasn’t impressed enough with it to discuss it. It wasn’t bad, but it wasn’t great either. (more…)

Book Review: 2012 Shortlisted: Alison Moore’s The Lighthouse (Review #4)

Rating: 3.5
The Lighthouse
A Novel by Alison Moore
2012 / 192 Pages

We all know that there is a deep connection between memory and the senses.  Sights, scents, and sounds can trigger all sorts of complicated emotional responses, but for the main character in Alison Moore’s Man Booker shortlisted novel, memory is hypersensitive, puzzling, and often devastating.  Futh is a quiet, middle-aged man on Holiday in Germany after a recent separation from his wife, Angela.  Their marriage has ended before Futh can accurately process exactly why, so he takes a short “vacation” to clear his head and try to figure out where things went wrong.  Along the way, he stays in a small, locally-operated hotel referred to as Hellhaus.  At the hotel, Futh finds the staff to be quite peculiar, especially Ester, who operates the hotel with her husband, Bernard.  As Futh embarks upon his painful and tedious journey of memory and self-exploration, we are alternately transported back to Hellhaus, where Futh’s presence has triggered a completely separate, but somehow connected resurgence of memories and abandoned thoughts.

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